Freedom Walk 2019
Apr
6
10:00 AM10:00

Freedom Walk 2019

  • National Japanese American Memorial (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

The 21st Annual Cherry Blossom Freedom Walk, an official event of the National Cherry Blossom Festival, will be held on Saturday, April 6, 2019.   The event will be held at the National Japanese American Memorial to Patriotism During World War II (Intersections of D St., New Jersey and Louisiana Aves., NW), rain or shine. 

Check-in begins at 9:00AM.  The Nen Daiko drummers of VA will perform at 9:30AM and the program will begin at 10:00AM. 

The Cherry Blossom Freedom Walk is a historical and cultural event to raise awareness about the Japanese American experience during World War II and to highlight the vigilant role that American citizens must continue to play in preserving the Constitutional rights of all Americans.  Built as a lasting tribute to the more than 33,000 Japanese American soldiers who served with great distinction in the U.S. Military, the Memorial also pays homage to the more than 120,000 persons of Japanese ancestry unjustly relocated during World War II.  It is also a testament to our nation’s greatness that it does not fear acknowledging its mistakes.

There is no charge to participate but donations are welcome. Click here to print out a registration form or donate here. Sponsors include the National Japanese American Memorial Foundation, the Japanese American Veterans Association, the Washington DC Chapter of the Japanese American Citizens League, and the Ekoji Buddhist Temple.  The NJAMF is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization, and donations are tax deductible to the fullest extent allowed by law. 

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Japanese American Veterans Association Luncheon
Mar
16
11:30 AM11:30

Japanese American Veterans Association Luncheon

Join local JAVA members to hear Ellen Nakashima, a national security reporter for The Washington Post and two-time Pulitzer Prize winner. She has written extensively about cyber and surveillance issues. In 2018, she and her colleagues won a Pulitzer Prize for reporting on Russia’s efforts to influence the outcome of the 2016 presidential election, and on the criminal investigation into potential coordination between Trump associates and Moscow. In 2014, she was part of a team awarded a Pulitzer Prize for reporting on the hidden scope of National Security Agency surveillance and its policy implications. Since joining The Post in 1995, Ms. Nakashima has also written about technology and privacy issues and served as a Southeast Asia correspondent (2002-2006), covering Islamic militant networks, the Indian Ocean tsunami and the SARS outbreak. She has reported on the White House and Virginia politics, and co-authored a biography on Al Gore. She graduated from the University of California at Berkeley and has a master’s degree in international journalism from The City University in London. Born in Hawaii, she is the granddaughter of immigrants from Japan and the daughter of a MIS Veteran, one of four brothers who served in WWII. Ms. Nakashima is married to Alan Sipress, an editor on the Foreign Desk of The Washington Post. They have one daughter, Natalie, who is 14.

To Register for the Luncheon, CLICK HERE. Cost is $20/person.

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Japanese American Confinement Sites Consortium meeting
Feb
26
to Feb 28

Japanese American Confinement Sites Consortium meeting

The Japanese American Confinement Site Consortium (JACSC), a group of organizations and individuals dedicated to preserving and sharing the Japanese American incarceration experience, will be meeting in Washington, DC. The Foundation is one of five council members of the group and will host events in concert with the meetings.

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Day of Remembrance
Feb
19
6:30 PM18:30

Day of Remembrance

Day of Remembrance 2019: Memory, Faith, and Music

February 19, 6:30-8:00 pm

Warner Brothers Theater, National Museum of American History

 

In observance of the Day of Remembrance, which marks President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s 1942 signing of Executive Order 9066 and subsequent incarceration of nearly 120,000 Japanese Americans, the museum will host a free film screening and live performance by the award-winning composer Kishi Bashi, and a guest lecture by renowned scholar Duncan Ryuken Williams.

In Omoiyari: a Songfilm by Kishi Bashi, composer Kaoru Ishibashi (professionally known as "Kishi Bashi") embarks on a personal quest by creating music in locations relevant to the Japanese American Incarceration. Omoiyari is a genre-breaking cinematic exploration that fuses history and art to examine the complexities of the human condition. NPR’s All Songs Considered listed Kishi Bashi as a favorite new artist, praising his work as “a radiant, uplifting soundscape.”

USC professor Duncan Ryuken Williams is the author of the new book American Sutra: A Story of Faith and Freedom in the Second World War, which for the first time explores the role of religion – particularly Buddhism – in the Japanese American incarceration. George Takei has called American Sutra “a must-read for anyone interested in the implacable quest for civil liberties, social and racial justice, religious freedom, and American belonging.”

Following the screening and lecture, Kishi Bashi and Duncan Ryuken Williams will join NMAH curators Noriko Sanefuji and Peter Manseau on stage for discussion and audience Q&A.

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Veterans Day 2018
Nov
11
2:00 PM14:00

Veterans Day 2018

In partnership with the Japanese American Veterans Association, the Pan Pacific American Leaders and Mentors Organization, and the DC Chapter of JACL, we will honor Japanese American veterans of WWII at the Memorial. Open to the public.

Also, check your local PBS station to find out when they are showing Lucy Ostrander’s film Proof of Loyalty: Kazuo Yamane and the Nisei Soldiers of Hawaii. On WETA in Washington, DC, it will be shown at 6 pm.

The film highlights the 100th Battalion and MIS veteran Kazuo Yamane. Following McKinley High School in Honolulu, Yamane graduated from Waseda University in Tokyo and returned to Hawaii in 1940. He was conscripted and was one of the 1,432 Nisei who were shipped to Camp McCoy, WI, to form the 100th Infantry Battalion. He was then transferred to the MIS and following Japanese language training was assigned to the Pentagon and other stateside posts.  

During his assignment at Camp Ritchie, MD, with a Japanese translation unit called PACMIRS, bags of documents were received from the Battle of Saipan all marked “no military significance”.  Yamane spotted a document entitled “File of Proceedings of 1944 Liaison Conference of Chiefs of Ordnance Departments” which recorded detailed munitions inventory and storage locations in Japan. The information was used by the Air Force to pinpoint bombing targets.  Towards war’s end, Yamane and a small team of linguists were sent to SHAEF headquarters in France to join a British force to raid the Embassy of Japan. This operation did not materialize.

Ostrander previously produced a film on Roy Matsumoto, a Merrill’s Marauder who saved his battalion from being overrun in Burma.

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